New York divorce lawyer

A Less Stress and Quick Divorce Process? Possible with the best NY Divorce Attorney

Making a tough decision like divorcing your partner can be hard to take in especially to your kids if have any. The longer it takes for your divorce process to be finalized, the harder it can be for all. That is why when you think of pushing through your plans of ending your marriage, better hire a good NY divorce lawyer who can make the process quick and easy.

Divorce for some people from other countries can be a big deal. But in the United States, divorce has already become part of the mores. This just means that people are only being practical. Couples who are not happy with their marriage are not wasting their time and effort trying to save the marriage when it can only add more stress and damage to the family. The idea of getting a divorce is only hard the moment the process starts, but if it has already been finalized, everyone can now move on with their lives.

New York divorce lawyer

Practicality for most people in a divorce case situation also means getting the best Manhattan divorce lawyer who can make the process worth their money. Finding a good divorce lawyer New York area can be hard. But it can guarantee couples to be worth it because there are law firms available in the city which can provide top caliber Manhattan divorce lawyer at a price everyone can afford. This will surely make people save their money and put the emotional stress of the family to an end.


Game On

blackbeardblog:

This is the text of the talk I gave at this morning’s Festival Of New MR session. I’ll follow it up with more posts and a reading list, but here’s the basic content. Of course, in this form you don’t get the various screenshots etc from retro videogames, but they’re not essential: the charts were intended as a kind of “hashtag” add-on to the talk - if you got what a game was and why it was on a slide, that’s a nice Easter Egg, but it’s not important for understanding the content.

SURVEYS ARE VIDEOGAMES

I started to become interested in research and games a year or so ago when an idea popped into my head: surveys are videogames. It made me smile, so I started looking for ways it might be true, then turned them into a short blog post. It got a few tweets, a couple of people mentioned it to me at conferences, but it didn’t seem 100% germane to the actual work I was doing, which has mostly been thinking about social media and communities.

But the idea wouldn’t leave my head.

Read More


147xxxx: Its happening!! →

Hey 1700 friends still following this tumblr - I’ve decided to actually start the process of turning my blog into a book! I think self-publishing right now seems to be the best route, and I like how cute the name lulu (as in lulu.com) is. I just started seriously organizing the material I have,…


147xxxx: Its happening!! →

Hey 1700 friends still following this tumblr - I’ve decided to actually start the process of turning my blog into a book! I think self-publishing right now seems to be the best route, and I like how cute the name lulu (as in lulu.com) is. I just started seriously organizing the material I have,…


lareviewofbooks:

There’s a new graphic novel version of Madeleine L’Engle’s classic young adult novel A Wrinkle in Time. Jenna Brager takes a look:

A Wrinkle in Time is part of a subgenre of young adult literature in which ordinary, plain children are called upon to do brave, incredible things with the help of newfound powers, and then, inevitably grow up to be extraordinary, attractive adults. In my solitary fort, I ate it up (along with the chips and chocolate). I was Hermione Granger, frizzy-haired and mocked and too smart for my own good. I was Bastian Balthazar Bux from The Neverending Story, chubby and lonely and transported into an epic adventure through the pages of a book. I was Meg Murry, bespectacled, outcast, and misunderstood. Superimposing myself onto Meg, I tessered across the universe with witches who quoted Shakespeare, flew on the back of an angel, fought against the Black Thing shadowing Earth, saved my father and brother from a giant brain that turned people into living automatons, and was cradled in the arms of a kindly fur-covered tentacle beast. I grappled with my own fears, of losing my parents, of being unpopular, of the world ending. I thought about good and evil, about conformity and difference, about love and hate and the existence of God. (A Wrinkle in Time and its sequels, like The Chronicles of Narnia and The Lord of the Rings, has been read as Christian allegory, drawing upon biblical themes and sometimes quoting the Bible directly, though it is accessible to readers of any background.) Rereading L’Engle’s classic today, I am astounded by the work that young-adult literature can do, the sophisticated places it takes our minds before we’re old enough to realize just what is happening.

Click here to read the rest of the review.

lareviewofbooks:

There’s a new graphic novel version of Madeleine L’Engle’s classic young adult novel A Wrinkle in Time. Jenna Brager takes a look:

A Wrinkle in Time is part of a subgenre of young adult literature in which ordinary, plain children are called upon to do brave, incredible things with the help of newfound powers, and then, inevitably grow up to be extraordinary, attractive adults. In my solitary fort, I ate it up (along with the chips and chocolate). I was Hermione Granger, frizzy-haired and mocked and too smart for my own good. I was Bastian Balthazar Bux from The Neverending Story, chubby and lonely and transported into an epic adventure through the pages of a book. I was Meg Murry, bespectacled, outcast, and misunderstood. Superimposing myself onto Meg, I tessered across the universe with witches who quoted Shakespeare, flew on the back of an angel, fought against the Black Thing shadowing Earth, saved my father and brother from a giant brain that turned people into living automatons, and was cradled in the arms of a kindly fur-covered tentacle beast. I grappled with my own fears, of losing my parents, of being unpopular, of the world ending. I thought about good and evil, about conformity and difference, about love and hate and the existence of God. (A Wrinkle in Time and its sequelslike The Chronicles of Narnia and The Lord of the Rings, has been read as Christian allegory, drawing upon biblical themes and sometimes quoting the Bible directly, though it is accessible to readers of any background.) Rereading L’Engle’s classic today, I am astounded by the work that young-adult literature can do, the sophisticated places it takes our minds before we’re old enough to realize just what is happening.

Click here to read the rest of the review.

(Source: lareviewofbooks)